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Magazine cover  Volume 30, No. supplement, 2019

Content

Figures


Location of case study areas in Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality (source: Marais et al., 2018)



Key aspects of asset value of houses owned, 1985‒2015 (source: Author’s survey)



Current mortgage amount as a percentage of the original mortgage amount (source: Author’s survey).


Urbani izziv Volume 30, No. supplement, February 2019 : 129-143

DOI: 10.5379/urbani-izziv-en-2019-30-supplement-009

 

   Article in PDF format

 

Author

Olebogeng LITHEKO

Department of Construction Management, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
LithekoOM@ufs.ac.za

Lochner MARAIS

Centre for Development Support, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
MaraisJGL@ufs.ac.za

Joris HOEKSTRA

Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, and Centre for Development Support, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
J.S.C.M.Hoekstra@tudelft.nl

Jan CLOETE

Centre for Development Support, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
CloeteJS@ufs.ac.za

Molefi LENKA

Centre for Development Support, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
LenkaMP@ufs.ac.za

 

Title

Black middle-income housing and asset building in Mangaung, South Africa

 

Abstract

Asset-building policies are used worldwide to reduce state welfare commitments. In the Global South, including South Africa, asset-based housing development is thought to help reduce poverty. This study investigated asset building and homeownership in a sample of South Africa’s emerging black middle class. Interviews with 244 black middle-class households in Mangaung revealed asset value creation and heavy dependence on mortgage finance. Levels of mortgage default were low, although households with recently secured mortgages struggled to pay them off. We found little evidence that property-owning is helping these households to move out of poverty. Their ability to afford mortgage loans appeared to be directly related to their own efforts and human capital. Very few had considered downsizing as an option, possibly because ownership of a house has social value, for passing on to the next generation. Asset building was still in its early stages and, because these households had been denied equal opportunities and barred from homeownership by the apartheid regime, very few intergenerational transfers had yet occurred.

 

Key Words

asset building, black middle class, housing, inheritance, poverty alleviation

 

 

 

PUBLISHER

Urbanistični inštitut RS
Urbani izziv - Editorial Board
Trnovski pristan 2, 1000 Ljubljana, SLO

  + 386 (0)1 420 13 10
  urbani.izziv@uirs.si

ISSN

Print edition: 0353-6483
Web edition: 1855-8399

INDEX

GOOGLE SCHOLAR
h5-index: 12
h5-median: 17
INDEX COPERNICUS
ICV 2018: 121,25
CLARIVATE ANALYTICS
Indeksirano v ESCI


SCOPUS ELSEVIER

SCImago Journal & Country Rank

1.2
2020CiteScore
 
84th percentile
Powered by  Scopus

SNIP (2020): 0.48
CiteScoreTracker (2021): 1.5

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